Imaging Technology Group

The primary mission of the Imaging Technology Group (ITG) is to provide state-of-the-art imaging facilities for researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. This service mission is accomplished through two facilities: the Microscopy Suite and the Visualization Laboratory.

A secondary mission of the ITG is to develop advanced imaging technologies with an emphasis on projects in remote instrument control and scientific visualization.

Image of the Week

Imaging Technology Group: Image of the Week: May 2, 2011 [ Link to full information ].

3D Printed Architectural Student Model

May 2, 2011

This is a 3Dimensional print of a 3D model built by Architectural Graduate student Yolanda Maria. The print was created in the Visualization Lab using a ZCorp 510 3D printer. The 3D model was created in Rhino 3D using NURBS modeling techniques, it was then converted to a polygon mesh for the 3d printing software. The printing software segments the 3D model into a hundreds of .1mm cross sections that are individually sent to the printer. This type of 3D printing technology prints a binding liquid, much like a 2D printer uses ink on paper. The printer bonds the multiple cross sections by printing the binder liquid onto a powder based composite building material. The 3D part is created by an additive layer-by-layer process. Users of The Visualization Lab are trained on the printing techniques which yield a physical prototype at any scale needed and can be sanded, painted and finished to give a professional presentation quality.

Image Courtesy: Yolanda Maria Baez Batista

Contact: y.m.b@aggiemail.usu.edu


Imaging & Visualization Forum

2018-02-27

Please contact ITG to propose a topic for this date.

ITG welcomes proposals for future Forums, please contact ITG for details. Previous Forums are available online.

News

Visualization Laboratory Acquires New Image Pro Plus v7 Image Analysis Software

PhotoThe Visualization Laboratory has acquired new image/video analysis software, Image Pro Plus version 7 (by Media Cybernetics). The software is capable of handling a range of image data for numerical analysis, including microscopy images, photographs, and video files. A major functionality for video or image sequences is the ability to track moving objects in a scene and derive a range of statistical information. Other measurment and processing functions are included, along with the ability to create macros for applying repeated/automated step-by-step procedures. Image Pro Plus is installed on the Visualization Laboratory computer "Krasner".

Image Credit:

Posted: July 18, 2011

Katharine Sharp goes digital

Photo

Travis Ross, visualization laboratory manager at the Beckman Institute, recently performed a 3D scan of the Katharine Sharp Memorial, a bas-relief sculpture of Katharine Lucinda Sharp, university librarian and founding director of the Graduate School of Library and Information Science (1893-1907). The sculpture was created by Lorado Taft and hangs in the Main Library.

The final 3D image was created by stitching together 40 individual scans, each capturing the rich texture of a piece that was originally sculpted in 1921. GSLIS Dean John Unsworth requested the scan, which uses advanced technology to further memorialize a groundbreaking leader, not only of this campus, but in the field of library and information science.

"We're grateful to the Imaging Technology Group and the Library for helping us turn Katharine Sharp into information that can now be shared freely," said Unsworth.

Image Credit: Photographer: L. Brian Stauffer, 3D Image: Travis Ross

Posted: July 7, 2011

Advanced Functional Materials Cover by ITG

Photo

The March 22, 2011 issue of Advanced Functional Materials cover features an image by ITG's Janet Sin-Hanlon. Created for the article "Biosensors: Control of Nanoscale Environment to Improve Stability of Immobilized Proteins on Diamond Surfaces", authored by Adarsh D. Radadia, Courtney J. Stavis, Rogan Carr, Hongjun Zeng, William P. King, John A. Carlisle, Aleksei Aksimentiev, Robert J. Hamers and Rashid Bashir, the image depicts antibodies attached to a diamond surface, improving protein function.

Image Credit: Janet Sinn-Hanlon

Posted: March 22, 2011